Medical News

  • LDL cholesterol found to be the main modifiable predictor of atherosclerosis in individuals with no risk factor
    LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), known as 'bad' cholesterol, is the underlying reason why many apparently healthy individuals have heart attacks or strokes during middle age despite not having cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, smoking, obesity, dyslipidemia or diabetes. Even at levels considered normal, LDL-C, after age and male sex, is the main predictor of the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries. This is the finding of research conducted at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) and published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). The results of the new study, led by CNIC Director Dr. Valentín Fuster, support the use of more aggressive strategies to reduce LDL-C, including for individuals considered at minimum risk. Fortunately, LDL-C is the main risk factor that can be modified in order to avoid the appearance of atherosclerotic plaques. Read more »
  • Scientists discover new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury
    There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration so therapies offering intervention are limited. People with severe spinal cord injuries can remain paralysed for life and this is often accompanied by incontinence. Read more »
  • ASH: Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell Tx beneficial in B-cell lymphomas
    (HealthDay)—Axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel), an autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy and autologous T cells that express a CD19-directed CAR (CTL019) are effective for refractory B-cell lymphomas, according to two studies published online Dec. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held from Dec. 9 to 12 in Atlanta. Read more »
  • ASH: A+AVD beats ABVD for advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma
    (HealthDay)—For patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma, brentuximab vedotin, doxorubicin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (A+AVD) have superior efficacy to doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD), according to a study published online Dec. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held from Dec. 9 to 12 in Atlanta. Read more »
  • Beta-cell sensitivity to glucose impaired after gastric bypass
    (HealthDay)—Individuals with prior Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GB) have blunted β-cell sensitivity to changes in glycemia, according to a study published online Nov. 20 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. Read more »
  • Preconception paternal SSRI use linked to ADHD in offspring
    (HealthDay)—Paternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) before conception is associated with increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Pediatrics. Read more »
  • ASH: High-dose gene transfer beneficial in severe hemophilia A
    (HealthDay)—For men with severe hemophilia A, high-dose factor VIII gene transfer is associated with sustained normalization of factor VIII activity levels, according to a study published online Dec. 9 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held from Dec. 9 to 12 in Atlanta. Read more »
  • Stair-step clomiphene reduces time to ovulation in PCOS
    (HealthDay)—The stair-step clomiphene protocol is associated with decreased time to ovulation for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to a study published online Dec. 4 in Obstetrics & Gynecology. Read more »
  • ASH: New approach to gene Tx restores immune cells in X-SCID
    (HealthDay)—A new approach to gene therapy can restore immune cell types in infants with newly diagnosed X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held from Dec. 9 to 12 in Atlanta. Read more »
  • Is there a best time of day for exercise?
    (HealthDay)—Many studies have tried to pinpoint the best time of day to exercise for peak performance and best results. But most of these studies were designed for elite athletes. Read more »
  • Good news, guys: Viagra prices start to tumble today
    (HealthDay)—In news that will delight men who've had difficulties in the bedroom, two generic versions of the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra are scheduled to hit the market Monday. Read more »
  • Scientists discover possible master switch for programming cancer immunotherapy
    During infection or tumor growth, a type of specialized white blood cells called CD8+ T cells rapidly multiply within the spleen and lymph nodes and acquire the ability to kill diseased cells. Some of these killer T cells then migrate where required to vanquish the germs or cancers. Read more »
  • Report: New system for more accurate cancer staging to aid precision medicine
    Adding a blood test called liquid biopsy to a standard tissue biopsy could significantly improve the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment for patients with cancer, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Read more »
  • Technology to drive advances in obesity-related diseases
    For the first time, researchers led by Frank Lau, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans, have successfully kept white fat tissue alive outside of the body for up to eight weeks. This breakthrough will pave the way for research advances improving treatment or prevention of such diseases as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer and others associated with white adipose tissue. Details are published as an Instant Online Article by the journal Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods, available here. Read more »
  • New research links brain structure with hallucinations and musical aptitude
    New research published in Schizophrenia Research conducted at the University of Liverpool links brain structure to an individual's likelihood of experiencing hallucinations and to their musical aptitude. Read more »
  • AML study reports high response rates with combination targeted therapy
    Initial findings from a multi-national open-label phase Ib study of inhibitory drug therapy for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have demonstrated a complete response in up to 50 percent patients say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center . Read more »
  • Liver cancer: Lipid synthesis promotes tumor formation
    Lipids comprise an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mTOR stimulates the production of lipids in liver tumors to satisfy the increased nutrient turnover and energy needs of cancer cells, among other functions. This process has also been observed in patients with liver cancer as the scientists report in Cancer Cell. Read more »
  • A new weapon against bone metastasis? Team develops antibody to fight cancer
    In the ongoing battle between cancer and modern medicine, some therapeutic agents, while effective, can bring undesirable or even dangerous side effects. "Chemo saves lives and improves survival, but it could work much better if you eliminate unwanted side effects from it," said Princeton University cancer researcher Yibin Kang, the Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology. Read more »
  • Selecting sounds: How the brain knows what to listen to
    How is it that we are able—without any noticeable effort—to listen to a friend talk in a crowded café or follow the melody of a violin within an orchestra? Read more »
  • Health warnings on cigarettes could deter young people
    Young people are less likely to try cigarettes with the printed health warning 'Smoking kills' on each stick than standard cigarettes, according to a new study by Cancer Research UK published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research. Read more »
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