Medical News

  • Addiction specialist explains fentanyl threat
    As the opioid crisis rages across the United States, people suffering from addiction as well as the first responders, doctors, and counselors trying to help them are facing another deadly challenge: fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 100 times more powerful than heroin and a growing part of the nation's illicit drug supply. Read more »
  • First 'haploid' human stem cells could change the face of medical research
    Stem cell research holds huge potential for medicine and human health. In particular, human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), with their ability to turn into any cell in the human body, are essential to the future prevention and treatment of disease. Read more »
  • Expert discusses the common misconceptions about obsessive compulsive disorder
    While most people have heard of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), there are many misconceptions about what it truly means to have it. A Baylor College of Medicine expert discusses these common misconceptions and gives her advice on the best treatment options for OCD. Read more »
  • Pre-synaptic cadherin/catenin complexes stablize post-synaptic spines in vivo
    Synapses are fundamental building blocks of neural circuits. Synapse formation requires complex regulation involving cell adhesion molecules, secreted molecules, transcription factors and so forth. For cell adhesion molecules, a critical unanswered question is whether pre- and post-synaptic partners contribute equally to synaptogenesis, or whether one side is predominant in inducing functional synapse formation and in stabilizing nascent synapses. Read more »
  • Mitochondrial flash signals long-term memory at neuronal synapse
    Why do some memories last a lifetime while others never persist for more than a few minutes? How are short-term memories converted into long-term memories? Read more »
  • Deadly diet: Thai doctors battle cancer-causing fish dish
    It wasn't until he got to medical school that Narong Khuntikeo finally discovered what caused the liver cancer that took both of his parents' lives: their lunch. Read more »
  • New technology aims to provide peace and positive stimulation to dementia patients
    Many people living with dementia reside in long-term care facilities, where the lack of stimulation can result in behaviors such as hitting, screaming, and wandering. Common measures to avoid such "responsive" behaviors, such as antipsychotic medications and personalized recreational and music therapy programs, can cause adverse health effects in the former case and be difficult for staff to find time to carry out in the latter case. A team of human factors/ergonomics researchers helped to evaluate and refine Ambient Activity (or AA; Ambient Activity Technologies Inc.), interactive tools designed to augment existing programs and activities by alleviating boredom and increasing engagement. Read more »
  • Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airways
    Mucus is important for maintaining healthy lungs. Inhaled particles, including bacteria and viruses, get trapped in mucus and then cilia—tiny hair like projections on the surface of the airway cells—sweep the mucus out of the airway. Read more »
  • A mouse's view of the world, seen through its whiskers
    Mice, unlike cats and dogs, are able to move their whiskers to map out their surroundings, much as humans use their fingers to build a 3D picture of a darkened room. Read more »
  • An infallible hand-held probe to aid cancer surgery
    Patients with common widespread forms of cancer will enjoy longer life expectancy and reduced risk of recurrence thanks to a multimodal optical spectroscopy probe developed by Canadian researchers. Read more »
  • At-risk chronic pain patients taper opioids successfully with psychological tools
    Psychological support and new coping skills are helping patients at high risk of developing chronic pain and long-term, high-dose opioid use taper their opioids and rebuild their lives with activities that are meaningful and joyful to them. Read more »
  • Artists and architects think differently compared to other people
    Architects, painters and sculptors conceive of spaces in different ways from other people and from each other, finds a new study by UCL and Bangor University researchers. Read more »
  • Technology should be used to boost empathy-based medicine
    Existing digital technologies must be exploited to enable a paradigm shift in current healthcare delivery which focuses on tests, treatments and targets rather than the therapeutic benefits of empathy. Writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Dr Jeremy Howick and Dr Sian Rees of the Oxford Empathy Programme, say a new paradigm of empathy-based medicine is needed to improve patient outcomes, reduce practitioner burnout and save money. Read more »
  • Microneedle patches for flu vaccination prove successful in first human clinical trial
    Despite the potentially severe consequences of illness and even death, only about 40 percent of adults in the United States receive flu shots each year; however, researchers believe a new self-administered, painless vaccine skin patch containing microscopic needles could significantly increase the number of people who get vaccinated. Read more »
  • Results from new global health task shifting trial surprise researchers
    One of the largest stroke rehabilitation trials ever undertaken has revealed family-led rehabilitation is ineffective. Read more »
  • Estimating Alzheimer's disease causative genes by an evolutionary medicine approach
    Alzheimer's disease patients are increasing with the aging of the world's population, becoming a huge health care and social burden. To find the cause of various diseases, in recent years, scientists have focused within the human genome on copy number variations (CNVs), which are changes in the number of genes within a population. Read more »
  • FDA takes steps to boost generic competition, limit prices
    The Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to boost the number of generic prescription drugs in an effort to make medicines more affordable and to prevent price gouging. Read more »
  • State: 111 terminally ill end lives under new California law
    California health officials reported Tuesday that 111 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives in the first six months after a 2016 law made the option legal in the nation's most populous state. Read more »
  • With health care cuts looming, low-cost magnesium a welcome option for treating depression
    Depression presents an enormous disease burden, with a reported 350 million people worldwide suffering from the disease, but traditional SSRI treatments carry a burden of their own - in dollars and side effects. New clinical research published today in PLoS One shows that over-the-counter magnesium appears safe and effective to treat mild to moderate depression. Read more »
  • Researchers ID network of neurons crucial for vocal learning
    Researchers have identified a network of neurons that plays a vital role in learning vocalizations by aiding communication between motor and auditory regions of the brain. Read more »
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